Saturday, May 25, 2013

Messier 8

I posted a picture of M8 a couple weeks ago that was pretty impressive, compared to what I had done before. Here is a picture 100x better. Since I signed up for the Astronomy course at Chapel Hill UNC, I can access their awesome 15" (16?) telescopes on a Chilean mountain with no light pollution. This is 15 photos of 40 seconds each, (5 each using a red, green, and blue filter), plus darks, flats and bias (astrophotography exposures necessary when using expensive ccds) stacked together in Deep Sky Stacker and edited in iPhoto.  So that's a total of 10 minutes for one final picture.

5 comments:

Keith said...

Very amazing, Noah. I confess, i don't really know what you are doing but it sure is good you are doing it.

mom said...

your definetly headed in the right direction, love it,lvoe,mom

Finn Haverkamp said...

Great photo. How did you learn the photographic process so quickly?

noah said...

I wouldnt say it was "quick." I've been taking astrophotos for a couple years now. However, Skynet makes it very simple. Just search for the object, specify the filters and duration of exposure, and press go! Then you open it up in Afterglow, and it already has it processed with the darks, flats and bias shots for you. That part i don't understand yet but it's not necessary to understand with Afterglow and Skynet. The stacking is done in a free program called Deep Sky Stacker which is also very easy: just open up the pictures, check them, and press "Register." There are TONS of options with all these steps, but i have mostly been using the default options. Then the post-processing is what i have spent some time with, but i'm not very good at it yet. At all. That's why the stars in this photo look strange.

kat said...

Stinkin awesome